How Reliable Is the Bible? – Part 3

British Library Add. MS 59874 Ethiopian Bible ...

Ethiopian Bible – Book of Matthew

The Bible is our only rule for faith and practice. If it is not reliable, then on what do we base our beliefs? Jesus asks for our trust, and that includes trust in what He says in His Word.

Faith.

Belief.

Trust.

Don’t those words demand some sort of unknown, unknowable?

Of course there are difficult passages in the Bible. Of course sincere men disagree over interpretations of the Bible.

These are the faults of man, not of God. Man is finite, and in his limited scope, tries to understand the Infinite and begins guessing and making up stuff, when he’d be better off simply trusting a bit.

God is complicated enough to make the entire universe with words. We should approach His words reverently and prayerfully, and when we find something we don’t understand, we should get over it.

Pray more, and study more.

Then if the mystery remains we humbly acknowledge our own limitations in the face of the perfect Word of God.

The Bible is an immeasurable source of authority. Taking 1500 years to write, yet consistent throughout, it is a library of books with 30 vastly different authors. Seers, vagabonds, kings, poets, slaves, fishermen, doctors, extremely wealthy and extremely poor–many never met or even heard of the others. Yet their words jive in ways no one could ever contrive. Their foretelling comes true and after centuries, later contributors are able to say, “THIS is what was spoken of by the prophets!” (Acts 2:16, among others)

This work IS the final interpretation of the truth. To consider the Bible apart from its one supreme purpose (the TRUTH) is to have a book and nothing more.

More tomorrow.

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image via Wikipedia

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10 thoughts on “How Reliable Is the Bible? – Part 3

  1. amyleebell says:

    “These are the faults of man, not of God.”
    Great point!
    I also like what you said about faith, belief, and trust requiring some sort of unknown. How can we prove that we trust someone if we always see things in the same light? Then we are just proving that we trust ourselves.
    I would also like to point out that lack of obedience translates directly into lack of trust. Going all the way back to the Garden, Eve didn’t trust that she would die. She didn’t trust that God had her best interests in mind. She thought He was keeping her from something good, instead of protecting her from something bad. So she disobeyed. Had she trusted more, she would have obeyed and saved herself a world of trouble!

    • katharinetrauger says:

      Amy, I love this input! Thanks so much for the way you have intensified what I am trying to do here! It is absolutely amazing when we think. All we have to do is think. Just think. And we are SO out of shape for that type of exercise! Thanks, again, Amy. 🙂

  2. iamnotshe says:

    Yes, Katherin, i try to think everything through. I always want to make sure it makes sense … the more i do that, the more i’m proven wrong: Nothing makes sense (at least to My sensibilites). Oh dear … i at least care about the concept of trust and faith, soul, love, kindness.

    Those characteristics aren’t made up by man!!! 😉 meliss xoxo

  3. Debbie says:

    “Then if the mystery remains we humbly acknowledge our own limitations in the face of the perfect Word of God.” Amen, katharine!
    I’m as convinced of the absolute beauty and truth of the Bible as I am of my own inability to know every answer it holds.
    I believe we have sufficient truth (if we seek it) for our OWN lives, just as we have sufficient grace, if we appropriate it. How could a loving Father offer less and how could His child demand more?
    Debbie

    • katharinetrauger says:

      Thanks for stopping by, Debbie, and for these great comments!
      Often I think of the Bible as an infinite treasure hunt. So much is hidden in it. In fact, it says that it is the glory of God to hide matters and the glory of kings to find them out. I imagine God enjoying hiding things and watching us find them. It would seem too simplistic, except–what parents haven’t done the same thing with their own children? 😀

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